Science & Technology

Young Americans – Heart Attack & Heart Disease

Heart Attacks Striking More Young Adults

18183

 

THURSDAY, March 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Although Americans are suffering fewer heart attacks, the rate is dramatically increasing among those under 40.

In fact, 20 percent of people who have a heart attack are 40 or younger, a rate that has risen 2 percent a year for 10 years, new research reports.

Some of these people are now in their 20s and early 30s, said senior study author Dr. Ron Blankstein, a cardiologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. He said it used to be “incredibly rare” to see anyone under age 40 with a heart attack.

“Based on what we are seeing, it seems that we are moving in the wrong direction,” he said.

These young heart attack victims also have the same risks of dying from another heart attack or stroke as older patients.

“Even if you’re in your 20s or 30s, once you’ve had a heart attack, you’re at risk for more cardiovascular events and you have just as much risk as someone who may be older than you,” Blankstein said.

Risk factors such as diabetes, high blood pressure, smoking, family history of premature heart attack and high cholesterol were the same among older and young people who suffered a heart attack, researchers found.

Younger patients drank less alcohol but were more likely to be substance abusers — 18 percent used marijuana and 9 percent used cocaine.

For the study, Blankstein and colleagues collected data on close to 2,100 patients under age 50 admitted to two hospitals for heart attacks.

“Many people think that a heart attack is destined to happen, but the vast majority could be prevented with earlier detection of the disease and aggressive lifestyle changes and management of other risk factors,” Blankstein said

To protect yourself, he recommends avoiding tobacco, getting regular exercise, eating a heart-healthy diet, losing weight if you need to, managing your blood pressure and cholesterol, avoiding diabetes, and staying away from cocaine and marijuana.

In a related study, Blankstein’s team found that 1 in 5 patients who suffer a heart attack before age 50 also have diabetes. Diabetics are more likely to have repeated heart attacks and die from a heart attack than other people.

These patients need aggressive treatment, Blankstein said. Some diabetes medications can reduce heart attack risk, he added.

The findings are to be presented on March 17 at the American College of Cardiology’s annual meeting in New Orleans. Research presented at meetings is considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

For more about heart attacks, visit the American Heart Association.

SOURCE: American College of Cardiology, news release, March 7, 2019

— Steven Reinberg

 


Obesity a Heartbreaker for Kids

TUESDAY, Feb. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Obesity and severe obesity have been added to the list of conditions that put children and teens at increased risk for early heart disease.

So says a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA).

“Parents need to know that some medical conditions raise the chances of premature heart disease, but we are learning more every day about how lifestyle changes and medical therapies can lower their cardiovascular risk and help these children live their healthiest lives,” statement writing group chair Dr. Sarah de Ferranti said in an AHA news release. She is chief of the Division of Cardiology Outpatient Services at Boston Children’s Hospital.

The latest statement is an update of a 2006 statement. Other conditions that increase the risk of early heart disease in children and teens include type 1 and type 2 diabetes, familial high cholesterol, congenital heart disease, and surviving childhood cancer.

Severe obesity and obesity are now included as moderate-risk and at-risk conditions, respectively, because research shows they significantly increase the risk of heart disease later in life, according to the AHA.

For example, a study of nearly 2.3 million people who were followed for over 40 years found that the risk of dying from heart disease was two to three times higher if they had been overweight or obese as teens.

In general, a gradual approach to weight loss is required, including healthier eating, fewer calories, more physical activity, meal replacements, drug therapy, and/or weight-loss surgery depending on the severity of obesity.

The updated scientific statement was published Feb. 25 in the journal Circulation.

Other major changes to the statement since 2006 include: boosting type 2 diabetes to a high-risk condition due to its links with other heart disease risk factors such as high blood pressure and obesity and expanding the risks of early heart disease associated with treatments for childhood cancers.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on children and healthy weight.

SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, Feb. 25, 2019

— Robert Preidt

Last Updated: 


Source: https://consumer.healthday.com

https://msdh.ms.gov

Advertisements

Categories: Science & Technology

Tagged as: ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s